The Ghost Hunter’s Getaway: Top Haunted Hotels

If you missed your chance to get away this summer, don’t you worry, there are a lot of awesome autumn adventures too. October means color-shifting leaves in about 30 states, complete with cooler days and warmer wear, all topped off with everyone’s favorite “holiday,” Halloween. October, obviously, is the best time to get your creep on. It’s high time to stay the night at a haunted hotel.

It’s easy to watch those ghost-hunting shows on TV. It’s the perfect dose of the paranormal, and from a safe distance too. But there are many reportedly haunted hotels across the country; so why not take a little weekend trip and see for yourself? Can you handle it?

Of course, we can’t promise you any supernatural encounters, but the following hotels are among the most haunted in the United States. They’ve got a whole cast of unpaying permanent guests and totally unpaid staff members. What we really mean is, they’ve got some ghosts. Here are the top haunted hotels.

1. Myrtle’s Plantation, St. Francisville, Louisiana

Image courtesy plantationadventure.com

Image courtesy plantationadventure.com

This plantation house was built in 1796, and it’s now considered one of the most haunted homes in the USA. The old mansion has been converted into an 11-room bed and breakfast. Among the various hauntings is the victim of a Reconstruction-era murder, not to mention a few stray spirits of those who died naturally on the grounds. You’ll enjoy your stay so much, you’ll never want to leave…

2. Hotel del Coronado, Coronado, California

Image courtesy citypass.com

Image courtesy citypass.com

This beach-front property has been a historic landmark since 1977, but a rich history isn’t the only thing the hotel is known for. The ghost of Kate Morgan haunts the hallways. Last year, the crew of the Travel Channel’s show “Ghost Adventures” hit up this hotspot, and they encountered a whole slew of paranormal activity. From inexplicably rocking chairs to children’s voices, one night at the Hotel del Coronado might be one night too many.

3. Marrero’s Guest Mansion, Key West, Florida

Image courtesy what-when-how.com

Image courtesy what-when-how.com

Francisco Marrero was a cigarmaker, but despite his legacy and riches, he couldn’t get the love of his life to come to Key West. That is, until he built this mansion in 1889. It worked wonders; his bride loved her home so much, she still hangs out there at night. But don’t worry, she’s nice. The mansion offers guests old Key West charm, with just a little side of the supernatural.

4. Stanley Hotel, Estes Park, Colorado

Image courtesy stanleyhotel.com

Image courtesy stanleyhotel.com

You might know this one as the inspiration for Stephen King’s “The Shining”. The hotel was completed in 1909, bringing tourism into the mountain town. To this day, the Stanley Hotel continues to be the most prominent fixture in Estes Park, but it’s because of Elizabeth Wilson. In the summer of 1911, Elizabeth, the head housekeeper, broke both of her ankles in an explosion because of a lightning strike during a storm. All this happened in Room 217, where her spirit still stays to take special care of this room’s guests.

5. Manresa Castle, Port Townsend, Washington

Image courtesy flickr.com

Image courtesy flickr.com

The “Castle” was completed in 1892, and at about 30 rooms, is by far the largest in the area. It was home to Charles and Kate Eisenbeis for only 10 years, until Charles died and Kate remarried. The mansion has had a legacy of love-lost from its very beginning, and now 302, 304 and 306 are reportedly haunted by two ghosts. One is about a monk who hung himself in the attic during the building’s time as a vacation home for nuns, and the other is a young woman who jumped to her death after hearing he would not be returning.

About the Author: Elsie Sing

 

Elsie is originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; her writing has appeared in a few university publications, under tables and on the sides of trains. She likes taking Polaroid pictures and planning rooftop picnics.

 

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